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Free timesheet calculator

Track employee hours and breaks with more efficiency and less hassle.

Rather than manually calculating employee hours and pay for payroll, this simple timesheet calculator will automatically calculate total hours and gross pay for you. You can include overtime and breaks to ensure that their hours and wages meet Fair Work Australia’s National Employment Standards.

Before you start, make sure you have the breakdown of hours your employee has worked each day. You can get employees to manually submit time sheets or use an automated calculator like TSheets to track these.

TIME CARD CALCULATOR

Type of time card

Days in a week

Overtime after

Pay Rates

Base Hourly

Overtime rate

TIMESHEET DETAILS

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Monday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Tuesday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Wednesday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Thursday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Friday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Saturday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Sunday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Monday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Tuesday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Wednesday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Thursday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Friday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Saturday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Sunday

0 hrs
+

Clock in

Clock out

Break

Total

Total Hours

0


Regular Hours

0

Overtime Hours

0

Total Gross Pay

$0.00

How to use the timesheet calculator

Here is the step by step instructions on how to use the time sheet calculator:

1. Select your timesheet details

For each employee, select the weekly timesheet to see one week of time entries or use the bi-weekly timesheet to see two weeks’ worth of time entries and add the number of days worked.

2. Add overtime rates

If an employee is eligible for overtime pay, select the employee’s overtime rule—whether they receive overtime pay for hours worked over 7.6 in a day, or 38 in a week. Note any employee who works in excess of 38 hours per week or 7.6 hours in a day must be paid overtime in Australia however, this calculator uses 8 hours in a day and 40 hours in a week to calculate overtime. Then add the employee’s base hourly pay rate, and select their overtime rate. This calculator can help with overtime rates that are 1.5 and 2 times the rate of the employee’s base pay.

However, these rates are just a guide only: overtime rates may vary depending on workplace agreements or industry. If the employee is not eligible for overtime, select “Exempt.”

3. Add times worked—don’t forget overtime and breaks

For each day the employee worked, add their clock in and clock out times. Those should include overtime hours. For even simpler calculations, use an automated timesheet tool like TSheets to do the math for you.

For each day the employee took an unpaid break, add those minutes in the box provided. Unpaid break minutes are subtracted from the total time.

4. Download and save or print the data

As you fill in the clock in and clock out times, the calculator determines the employee’s total hours (regular and overtime) and total gross pay.

Once you have completed the information, enter your email address in the box provided to download a copy of your employee’s times worked.

Common issues calculating timesheets

1. Misclassified employees

Most often, employees are classified as exempt from overtime because they’re paid an annual salary. But not all salaried employees are exempt automatically. If you’ve misclassified an employee, you may not be paying them the overtime they’re eligible for. Misclassifying employees leaves you vulnerable to unpaid back wages, in addition to the potential litigation and possible Fair Work Australia penalties for not applying the award wage.

2. Failure to pay overtime

In 2018, The Guardian reported an epidemic of time theft in Australia – employees are providing an average of two months of work to employers for free every year. A separate survey the following year backed this up: it revealed that full-time. employees in Australia are working an average of 5.18 hours’ unpaid overtime per week, which marks a steady increase in recent years. Any employee who works in excess of 38 hours per week or 7.6 hours in a day must be paid overtime. Managers can discipline employees for not following company overtime policies – but business owners can’t deny employees overtime pay.

3. Mismanaged employee breaks

Fair Work Australia allows an employee to take paid rest breaks (usually less than 10 minutes, and also known as a tea break) and unpaid meal breaks. A meal break is a longer period than a rest break – usually 30 minutes for every 5 hours worked. A meal break isn’t a condition under the National Employment Standards, however you should check all guidelines around breaks with your relevant industry award and any workplace agreements. If you’re not tracking breaks in your employees’ hours calculator correctly, you’re at risk of litigation and Fair Work penalties.

*Disclaimer: please check your relevant employee agreement, industry award and/or enterprise agreements for specific information regarding your pay calculations

Automate timesheet calculations, and save time and money on payroll with TSheets—free for 14 days.